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Experience: World Rugby to replace penalty shootouts with a one-on-one match

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World Rugby is set to experiment with a new method for determining the winner of tied matches, where the competition is settled through a one-on-one match between an attacker and a defender.

World Rugby has reportedly given the go-ahead for the trial, with the goal of seeing it replace penalty kicks at goal. This is still the style of determining the knockout matches in the Champion’s Cup and World Cup.

The way the new format would work would involve an attacking player from the first team receiving the ball 30 meters from the opponent’s attempt line, with one defender from the second team standing on the 5-meter line.

If the attacker scores within the allowed 10 seconds, the second team will have to match it or else they will lose the match.

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‘Negative Impact’ – Nigel Owens wants five changes to the law to encourage ‘extended rugby’

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#1. Cancel goal line exit

Owens wrote: “For the goal-line dropouts, I was a huge fan at first because I felt it would prevent the attacking teams from taking many quick shots close to the try line, with the teams instead trying to move the ball wide to avoid losing control. It worked as planned.We continue to see a lot of criticism until the teams finish, we still see a lot of hits and the number of collisions has not decreased.

“We are also seeing fewer scrapes near the goal line and, to be honest, I’m not sure that’s a good thing. Scrum should be such an important part of the game, and at the moment we’re not seeing its benefits. Rugby should remain a game of all shapes and sizes. And on all levels, too.

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The attacking teams also kick longer knowing that if the ball rolls dead, the defending team must drop the goal line and they can recover the ball. We’ve also missed the short dropouts we used to see from the 22-meter line as teams race to get the ball back, or the leak will be stopped quickly, because teams are now back up on their goal line just kicking the ball long to escape and what happens? The opposition kicked her back.

“From initially believing it would work, I would now like the law of leaving the goal line to be true. If anything it has a negative impact.”

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